Different Types of Divorce in Michigan (Part 1)

Both marriage and divorce are legal processes that occur almost across the entire world. The only exceptions being the Philippines and the Vatican City, which do not allow divorce. While marriage is a fairly standard contract that doesn’t change much in it’s nature from place to place, divorce laws can and do differ vastly in each jurisdiction; both within the United States and around the world.

 

For all of the available variations on a theme, there tend to be two basic approaches to divorce: fault based and no-fault based. It is important to note that even in jurisdictions that don’t require a ‘fault’ to be assigned to one of the partners in order to justify a divorce, the court might still take  ‘fault’ behavior into consideration when dividing assets and establishing custody arrangements.

 

This is true of Michigan, which is a no-fault divorce state. This means that any married person who is a resident of the state can sue for divorce from their spouse, without having to prove a wrongdoing. A court in Michigan can grant a divorce if “there has been a breakdown in the marriage relationship to the extent that the objects of matrimony have been destroyed and there remains no reasonable likelihood that the marriage can be preserved.”

 

But family law in Michigan has changed over time.

 

Prior to the late 1960’s, most states in the U.S. required that a person prove that their spouse had committed an act that violated the marriage contract in order to show valid “grounds” for a divorce. Examples would be physical abuse of a spouse or their children, an extra-marital affair, or abandoning a spouse. In Michigan, as of 1972, all a person needs to do in order to end a marriage is allege that the relationship has broken down so far as to be unsavable.

 

In jurisdictions that require “irretrievable breakdown” in the marriage relationship as grounds for divorce, the simple statement that the marriage cannot be redeemed is sufficient to satisfy the court. Certain jurisdictions require that there be “irreconcilable differences”, but verbal assurances are enough, and additional proof is not required by the court.

 

A no-fault divorce jurisdiction will grant a divorce even if only one partner wants the divorce. This is the currently the case in Michigan, where a divorce will be granted even if only one partner wants it. This is true even if the other partner refuses to comply, or actively works to undermine the process.

 

Join us in the next segment as we wrap up a brief overview of the ways in which divorce can be executed here in Michigan. Because knowledge is power, and the more you know, the more prepared you will be if the time ever comes when divorce is something you need to handle in your own life.

Testimonials

Stephanie just finished settling my divorce case. She did an excellent job handling every aspect of the case. When I came to her looking for an attorney, not knowing what was to come, angry and upset, she did excellent job reassuring me that everything was going to be okay. She explained the divorce process, what I could expect over the next few months and outlined the possible outcomes. She was well aware of my financial situation and very limited expendable income and did a great job doing whatever she could to keep my costs down. At times she would even remind me that she is happy to pursue any direction I wanted to go, but the cost involved may not outweigh the outcome. She did an excellent job letting me know where I could do things myself rather than paying the firm to do it as well as provided assistance to make sure I did it in the proper manner. And what was most impressive is a meeting with the ex and her lawyer. Stephanie actually had her phone out pulling up case law and verifying it to make sure the ex and her lawyer didn’t get something over on me. VERY IMPRESSIVE!. If you want an excellent attorney who isn’t going to tell you what you want to hear just to increase the cost for the firm’s benefit, call Stephanie Service.

Brian on Avvo, 2014

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